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As a BFA, or BA/BFA student, you will take these courses in your first year: Integrative Studio/Seminar 1 and 2; two liberal arts courses: Objects as History and Sustainable Systems; three first-year studios: Drawing/Imaging, Space/Materiality, and Time; and an elective.

Rank Your Course Options
In the first step of using this tool, you'll read about your required courses. Most of your courses have several thematic options within them, so take a moment to think about which ones strike your interest, and rank them in that order. Regardless of the theme, the course options are all designed to teach core skills and ideas that are relevant across a broad range of art and design disciplines that you will build on as you progress through your studies at Parsons.

Schedule Your Courses
In the second step, you'll plan a schedule for your first year by placing your courses into the fall and spring semesters. Some courses are generally taken in one semester or the other, while others can be taken in a sequence of your choosing.

Throughout the exercise, you'll find that you can drag and drop or click to move your options into place. Once you've made your decisions, you can change your mind and move things around. Please note that the browser will not save your choices, so be sure to work your way to the last step before closing out of the tool. You'll have the ability to save a summary of the decisions you've made, and this will help you through the registration process.

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As a BBA student, your curriculum will be very similar to BFA students, with a few requirements specific to your degree. In your first year you will take Integrative Studio/Seminar 1 and 2; three liberal arts courses: Sustainable Systems, Quantitative Reasoning 1, and Intro to Political Economy; two out of the three first-year studios: Drawing/Imaging, Space/Materiality, and Time; and an elective.

Rank Your Course Options
In the first step of using this tool, you'll read about your required courses. Some of your courses have several thematic options within them, so take a moment to think about which ones strike your interest, and rank them in that order. Regardless of the theme, the course options are all designed to teach core skills and ideas that are relevant across a broad range of art and design disciplines, that you will build on as you progress through your studies at Parsons.

Schedule Your Courses
In the second step, you'll plan a schedule for your first year by placing your courses into the fall and spring semesters. While many of your courses are offered only in one semester or the other, your studio courses can be taken in a sequence of your choosing.

Throughout the exercise, you'll find that you can drag and drop or click to move your options into place. Once you've made your decisions, you can change your mind and move things around. Please note that the browser will not save your choices, so be sure to work your way to the last step before closing out of the tool. You'll have the ability to save a summary of the decisions you've made, and this will help you through the registration process.

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Now that you've ranked all your course options, you can try creating a possible schedule.

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Great. Now that you have a potential schedule, you're almost done!

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You're almost done! Please make an appointment with your advisor to register for your First Semester at The New School.

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BFA
BA/BFA
Parsons/Lang Dual Degree, with Parsons major:
BBA

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Welcome. This course planning tool will help you understand the types of courses and course options you have in your first-year studies. You can play around with your choices here before you meet with your advisor to register. Start by choosing your degree type and reading the instructions that follow.

Step 1: RANK YOUR COURSE OPTIONS
Dr

PUFY 1030 Drawing / Imaging

Drawing / Imaging explores how meaning is constructed and communicated through two-dimensional images. In this course you will use both traditional drawing techniques and digital imaging methods to consider the conceptual, aesthetic and formal qualities of visual representation. You will be encouraged to make work that feels risky and unknown and to work in ways that are unfamiliar. As you build skills of observation and representation, you will be guided through a process of attempting, failing and learning to trust. Drawing is a multidisciplinary tool. It is a form of thinking that can be used to help us see, imagine, strategize or give shape to an idea. This course will introduce you to a range of materials and media from charcoal and pencil to collage and photography, as well as Illustrator and Photoshop. Sketchbooks will be used to brainstorm, experiment, process and pursue curiosities. Alongside studio based projects, the class has regular discussions, critique and written responses. Writing and conversation will place images in an historical and cultural context and create space for an exchange of ideas. The skills developed in this course are foundational to all majors and disciplines.

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People

What is a body? How do our bodies define us? How do we perceive and understand other bodies? What is the history and context of our perception, assumptions, and ideas about individuals and communities? These are just a sample of questions to be addressed by this section.

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Places + Things

What is visible and invisible in our surroundings? What is our relationship to place? How do we create and derive meaning from objects? This section focuses on space and on objects as a way to examine our assumptions about what is considered personal, private, public, and historically true.

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Language

What can signs and symbols convey? How do visual images enhance or create meaning? In this class students will address these questions by using the concrete elements of design and observational drawing to explore and develop a visual language.

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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PUFY 1000/1010 Integrative Seminar 1

Sol LeWitt famously said that “ideas are machines for making art.” Integrative Seminar 1 awakens the possibilities of writing as an exciting, dynamic source of inspiration. It can be an experimental space full of play and invention. It can be a formal and rigorous space for debate. It can be a tool used to process, explore, express or reflect. Writing does not simply represent thought, it is a catalyst to form thought. In this course you will be introduced to a diverse range of texts (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, journalism, theory) in order to consider the expressive possibilities of language. Class discussions will examine how writing conveys ideas and emotions. They will also make room for your voice to enter into larger critical and creative conversations. At the heart of the the integrative model is the connection to your Integrative Studio class. Our goal is to make reading, writing and critical thinking essential components of the art, design and strategic thinking processes. The two courses are tied together conceptually through a shared theme (as defined by the keyword of your class) and through bridge projects. Bridge projects are shared assignments between studio and seminar. They ask you to explicitly and productively blur the boundaries between the two courses. What happens when writing becomes a form of making, and making becomes a form of thinking?

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Avatar

An avatar creates an identity that is distinct from the original and yet intensely connected to it at the same time. It can have a spiritual connotation, meaning the physical manifestation of a soul, or virtual one, when used to mean a representation of the self in the online world. How can we use the idea of an avatar to think critically about ideas of regeneration and embodiment? Self and other?

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Fake

How do we define what is fake and what is real, and what are the various values we attribute to these categories? Through the lens of Fake, we explore the ways that ideas, images and objects can be used – positively and negatively – to produce alternative forms of knowledge and views of reality.

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Memory

Memory is an act of imagination. It can be a process of recollecting or commemorating a person, an object, an event. It can be individual or collective. How does memory shape our identity and our understanding of the world? How can we use it as both a tool and a topic for our work?

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Shift

A shift is a subtle change which can have enormous consequences. It suggests movement from one place to another, or one idea to another. It can be personal or cultural. What are your stories of shifting? How did they come to pass? How can we talk about them through our work?

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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PUFY 1000/1010 Integrative Studio 1

In this course we explore the creative process. It’s not simply about what we make, or how we make it, but why? What do you do with an idea? Is there more than one way to approach an assignment? How can research become part of this process? You will engage in a series of cross-disciplinary projects that ask you to make up and define your own rules. You will actively: question, observe, visualize, play, fail, reframe, experiment, fabricate, and reflect. In Integrative Studio 1, projects scale from the individual to the collective. You will start with the self, and then enter into a conversation with your peers, before moving into a collaborative group dynamic. Finally, you will use research conducted in Integrative Seminar to inspire a culminating project which utilizes skills built over the semester across courses. At the heart of the the integrative model is the connection to your Integrative Seminar class. Our goal is to make reading, writing and critical thinking essential components of the art, design and strategic thinking processes. The two courses are tied together conceptually through a shared theme (as defined by the keyword of your class) and through bridge projects. Bridge projects are shared assignments between studio and seminar. They ask you to explicitly and productively blur the boundaries between the two courses. What happens when making becomes a form of thinking and writing becomes a form of making?

A
Avatar

An avatar creates an identity that is distinct from the original and yet intensely connected to it at the same time. It can have a spiritual connotation, meaning the physical manifestation of a soul, or virtual one, when used to mean a representation of the self in the online world. How can we use the idea of an avatar to think critically about ideas of regeneration and embodiment? Self and other?

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Fake

How do we define what is fake and what is real, and what are the various values we attribute to these categories? Through the lens of Fake, we explore the ways that ideas, images and objects can be used – positively and negatively – to produce alternative forms of knowledge and views of reality.

Me
Memory

Memory is an act of imagination. It can be a process of recollecting or commemorating a person, an object, an event. It can be individual or collective. How does memory shape our identity and our understanding of the world? How can we use it as both a tool and a topic for our work?

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Shift

A shift is a subtle change which can have enormous consequences. It suggests movement from one place to another, or one idea to another. It can be personal or cultural. What are your stories of shifting? How did they come to pass? How can we talk about them through our work?

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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PUFY 1001 /1011 Integrative Seminar 2

This course aims to challenge old beliefs about what you can do with writing. It invites inquiry and helps you to think about research as an energized idea. In Integrative Seminar 2 you will be encouraged to pursue topics you find perplexing and fascinating. How can curiosity lead you to ask productive questions and get answers to them? How can you create a writing process that is organic and unfolds over time? In the first half of the semester quick assignments will introduce you to a variety of research methods and help you to define an area of interest. In the second half of the semester you will pursue your own research based project connected to studio. Throughout the semester, you will read texts which explore a wide array of forms that researched writing can take. Once again, studio and seminar will come together through a series of bridge projects that highlight the components of the research process: inquiry, context, investigation, interpretation, argument, connections and reflection. Bridge projects are the basis of the collaborative relationship of ideas between the two courses. They ask you to engage with writing as a form of making, and making as a form of thinking, in order to explicitly and productively blur the boundaries between seminar and studio.

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Systems and Strategies

A system is a set of individual things working together in a network. A strategy is a plan or action. This prompt explores design's role in shifting the social, environmental, and economic impacts of individuals, groups, communities and organizations. How can we use design strategies to promote change, foster creativity, and re-imagine the experiences dictated by a broad range of established systems?

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Constructed Environments

A constructed environment is a surrounding, made by human or animal, built for an activity. How do constructed environments inform and shape our sense of reality? Can we facilitate transformative human experiences through the products we design and the spaces we build? We will explore the ways that light and materials affect our environments. We will consider how the energy and resources we use change us. Our goal is to combine the interconnectedness of large-scale thinking with social engagement as a way to understand a variety of design approaches.

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Fashion

Fashion refers to popular ways that people costume, decorate, and adorn the body. How does fashion create meaning around identity and culture? How can we learn to see fashion in all its complexity as a system of material, image, body and history? Students will engage with these complexities while interrogating new ways to approach topics such as form, beauty and sustainability.

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Visual Culture

Visual culture refers to images that surround us. Meaning is embedded in the endless images, spaces, and artifacts that make up our visual culture. How can we learn to unearth the ideas being communicated through a broad range of forms – art, advertisements, products, fashion, photography, illustration, architecture, performance, technology etc. What new and unexpected forms demand our scrutiny?

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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PUFY 1001 /1011 Integrative Studio 2

Integrative Studio 2 builds on the exploratory skills introduced in Integrative Studio 1. This time a greater emphasis is placed on research as the tool for forming connections between studio and seminar. In the first half of the semester you will be given quick assignments to introduce a variety of studio based methods for generating questions, integrating research, and documenting discoveries in your art and design work. We focus on embracing failure and trial and error as core elements of the creative process. In the second half of the semester you will define and pursue your own research based project connected to seminar. Once again, studio and seminar will come together through a series of bridge projects that highlight the components of the research process: inquiry, context, investigation, interpretation, argument, connections and reflection. Bridge projects are the basis of the collaborative relationship of ideas between the two courses. They ask you to engage with making as a form of thinking, and writing as a form of making, in order to explicitly and productively blur the boundaries between studio and seminar.

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Systems and Strategies

A system is a set of individual things working together in a network. A strategy is a plan or action. This prompt explores design's role in shifting the social, environmental, and economic impacts of individuals, groups, communities and organizations. How can we use design strategies to promote change, foster creativity, and re-imagine the experiences dictated by a broad range of established systems?

E
Constructed Environments

A constructed environment is a surrounding, made by human or animal, built for an activity. How do constructed environments inform and shape our sense of reality? Can we facilitate transformative human experiences through the products we design and the spaces we build? We will explore the ways that light and materials affect our environments. We will consider how the energy and resources we use change us. Our goal is to combine the interconnectedness of large-scale thinking with social engagement as a way to understand a variety of design approaches.

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Fashion

Fashion refers to popular ways that people costume, decorate, and adorn the body. How does fashion create meaning around identity and culture? How can we learn to see fashion in all its complexity as a system of material, image, body and history? Students will engage with these complexities while interrogating new ways to approach topics such as form, beauty and sustainability.

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Visual Culture

Visual culture refers to images that surround us. Meaning is embedded in the endless images, spaces, and artifacts that make up our visual culture. How can we learn to unearth the ideas being communicated through a broad range of forms – art, advertisements, products, fashion, photography, illustration, architecture, performance, technology etc. What new and unexpected forms demand our scrutiny?

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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PUFY 1100 Object as History

Objects as History asks you to look, with care, at how the world of “things” defines who we are and where we have come from. You will learn to ask fundamental questions that allow you to “read” an object: What is it? What are its visual characteristics? Who made it? How was it used? When we look at objects we will consider questions about material, style, context, function and process. We will make connections across time periods and cultures from prehistory (times before recorded human histories) to the 19th-century. Can we trace a path from Neolithic tools to the first desktop computers? From medieval armor to contemporary drones? In this course we will address historical objects in ways that allow you to make connections to the present and to the disciplines you plan to enter as artists, designers and strategic thinkers. This includes critically engaging the frameworks we use to determine what “counts” as art and design, how it is understood, what is considered valuable, and to whom. This might include engaging with current debates about museums as institutions, restitution of objects to the places and cultures from which they were taken, and where art and design even belongs. The course aims to create a common visual vocabulary useful to all students through lecture, analysis, discussion and direct experience with works.

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PUFY 1020 Space / Materiality

Building is an act of transformation. How do we translate a thought into a thing? How do we take an idea from a flat world to a three-dimensional world? In this class you will learn the techniques of physical construction: joining, inserting, interlocking, nesting, slotting, folding, collapsing. You will also come to understand how force, resistance and gravity affect construction. Space / Materiality will look at three types of space: haptic (related to touch); inhabited (lived in or occupied space); and social and environmental (related to society and the natural world). We embrace learning through failure, taking a trial and error approach to finding out about material properties. We will experiment with concepts such as malleability, weight, texture, durability, and think about ways to engage all the senses as we create three-dimensional projects. Discussion, critique, and written responses will create a class community of idea-sharing. These will help you to understand your work in historical and cultural contexts, including the social and ecological impacts of the materials you use.

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Community

Community is defined as a group of people with a commonality of characteristic, interests or goals. We form our personal identities within our communities. A community may define itself through its ethnicity, country of origin, political beliefs, religious beliefs, neighborhood, educational background, or any number of common identifying factors. How do our attitudes about what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? This course will explore the relationship between the shifting boundaries of community.

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Culture

Culture can be understood as a set of shared behaviors and traditions. What is the role of the artist and designer within their own narrow definition of culture? How do artists and designers even define and describe culture? Do we do this by our city, state, country, continent? How do we contribute to and advance the cultures of which we are a part? Students will create objects and environments that reflect and respond to existing definitions of cultural identities, and will explore the relationship of the individual to the larger society.

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Body

A body is a physical form that contains living beings. When we refer to “the body,” whose body are we referencing? How do we understand the complexities and nuances of individual bodies within the context of culture, community, history and language? This section will focus on how bodies have an impact on our surroundings and the objects within it. How do ergonomics, structure, and self-image correspond to the shape, movement and impact of the human form? We will use a range of methods to explore concepts of personal space, costuming and decorating the body, and how objects function in relationship to the body.

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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PUFY 1100 Sustainable Systems

Anything we extract from the earth must ultimately go back into it. This course aims to create an emotional and intellectual connection with the life forms and environments which bear the burden of our choices. How can designers, artists and strategic thinkers create products, systems and services that are socially, environmentally and economically sustainable? Sustainable Systems is structured around four major themes: Climate Change, Materials, Energy, and Water. We explore these environmental issues as complex and interrelated topics. Understanding them can help us address current social and justice issues in new ways. In this course you will study real conditions that are both local and global. Class activities will combine field trips, lectures, discussion, studio-based workshops, lab experiments and seminars. Fieldwork and applied research methods will be developed into creative works that address diversity, adaptability and resilience in the face of ever changing conditions.

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PUFY 1040 Time

In this class we will explore the “idea” of time. How do we track time? How is it experienced in the real world? How is it experienced in a piece of art? Throughout the semester, you will engage with the idea that time is a malleable concept. When you begin to consider the cultural and perceptual constructions of time, it becomes a material whose properties you can learn to manipulate and use in your work. You will be introduced to time-based media, including InDesign (time across the page) and Premiere Pro (time in motion). Through these programs and others you will learn to create layouts for print, as well as edit and shoot video. You will experiment with attention span, duration, linear and non-linear narratives. Studio projects, readings, writing and examples of many artists’ work are used to examine how our ideas about time have evolved. The course encourages a spirit of play and experimentation. How does time impact our sense of memory and identity in ways that can influence our art, design and strategic thinking processes?

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Composition

Composition implies structure, and it can take many forms. It is a way of organizing material into a coherent and engaging outcome. In terms of time, structure appears to come to us pre-packaged in linear increments as seconds, minutes and hours. But what new or unexplored structures can we use to view or perceive time?

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Embodied

Time can be measured through the body in any number of ways: from physical aging, to kinetic movement, to the performance of everyday actions, to our own changing style. This class explores aspects of performance, ritual, identity and live-art, as expressed through the physical body and the impact it has on the space around it.

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Frame

This class will begin with a single frame: a moment in time. From this starting point you will work with variables such as movement, progression or space to create experimental stories in a variety of forms such as graphic novels, montage, visual languages and book arts.

  • Drag and drop or click your options to rank them.
  • After you rank all of the available options, you can rearrange your choices by dragging and dropping.
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Step 2: SCHEDULE YOUR COURSES
IS1

PUFY 1000/1010 Integrative Studio / Seminar 1

IS2

PUFY 1001/1011 Integrative Studio / Seminar 2

Ob

PLHT 1000 Objects as History

Su

PUFY 1100 Sustainable Systems

Dr

PUFY 1030 Drawing / Imaging

Sp

PUFY 1020 Space / Materiality

Ti

PUFY 1040 Time

El

Elective

Fall
Spring
Step 3: SAVE YOUR COURSE PLAN

Enter your information to save your completed course plan.

!! This is not your official schedule, please be sure to make an appointment with your advisor.


Student ID: N
2. Make your appointment
1. Print as PDF

Your First-Year Course Plan

Name: Wenting Zhang
Student ID: N00280119

Step 4: SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH YOUR ADVISOR

Now that you have reviewed your course options and planned your year, you have completed an essential first step in the advising and registration process. The next step is to schedule an appointment with your advisor:

  • Go to my.newschool.edu and log in.
  • Click on the "Academics" tab.
  • Find the Student Success Network and click on "Login to Student Success Network" (you must allow pop-ups in your browser).
  • Click on the "Schedule an Appointment" button.
  • You'll see your academic advisor listed in the My Success Network area on the left. Click on the "See Available Appointments" link under your advisor's name to go to his or her calendar.
  • Select an available meeting time by clicking on the "Sign Up" link next to the time you want to see your advisor.
  • Note that you will be attending an online course registration session, and click "Submit."

Your advisor will go over your choices with you and discuss any concerns or questions you have about registration. If you have transfer credits, speak English as your second language*, or are enrolled as a BA/BFA student**, your advisor will also help you to understand the differences in your options and schedule. Please be sure to have a copy of your first-year course plan nearby.

* If English is your second language, your placement level will be determined during new student orientation. Please note that some changes to your schedule may be required if you place into language-supported courses. Your advisor will help you to make any necessary adjustments. You should discuss your options during your advising meeting.
** As a BA/BFA student, there are several alternative options available to you. Some BA/BFA students take a course of study evenly balanced between Parsons and Lang, while others choose a more immersive experience in one of the divisions. Now that you've explored your options at Parsons, you should work with your advisor to determine the schedule that best reflects your interests and prior experience.